Hyundai Artlab

CHOIJEONGHWA: Blooming Matrix

MMCA
2018
MMCA Hyundai Motor Series
Young Flower, 2016-2018
Young Flower, 2016-2018
Plastic crown, steel structure, dimension variable. Image provided by MMCA

MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2018: CHOIJEONGHWA - Blooming Matrix

September 5 2018 – February 10 2019, MMCA Seoul

About the Exhibition

CHOIJEONGHWA known for utilizing common, cheap, or discarded goods from everyday life, from plastic baskets and brooms to piggy banks and balloons, presented Blooming Matrix, Dande...

CHOIJEONGHWA known for utilizing common, cheap, or discarded goods from everyday life, from plastic baskets and brooms to piggy banks and balloons, presented Blooming Matrix, Dandelion, Ice Flower, and Young Flower for the MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2018: CHOIJEONGHWA - Blooming Matrix. Each work is a manifestation of the artist's intention to give meaning to objects that have lost their functions. Continuing to explore the potential of materials like plastic, wood, steel, and cloth, the artist revealed an expanded materiality of objects. Blooming Matrix, which was a spatial installation, brought together objects that he had collected from different places but to exist in harmony. With a forest of some 120 towers of flowers, in a space of light and darkness, CHOIJEONGHWA blended time and space, transforming the gallery into a space of silence and memory. Dandelion, which was installed in MMCA Seoul’s Madang was a result a public art project by the artist in the cities of Seoul, Busan, and Daegu. He received donations of everyday objects from residents and collected approximately 7,000 pieces of tableware that were no longer in use. These comprised the colossal sculpture Dandelion, which measured 9 meters in height, and weighed 3.8 tons.

CHOIJEONGHWA (born in Seoul, Korea, in 1961) gives everyday consumable goods a new life, breaking the boundaries between art and popular culture. Choi’s work is often a metaphor for the post-1990s Korean society born from rapid economic growth. Throughout the 1990s, Choi designed spaces for young generations that blends food, music, exhibitions, performances, and seminars: Bar Ollo Ollo (1990), Space Ozone (1991), and SAL Bar (1996) and Ggool (2010). Surrounded by Korean consumer culture, which underwent dynamic changes in the 1990s, CHOIJEONGHWA brought the club scene and popular culture into art, thereby weaving an intimate relationship between contemporary art and popular culture. His work is represented in museum collections including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Mori Art Museum and The Museum of Fine Art, Houston and in recent years has held solo exhibitions at Gyeongnam Art Museum (2020), Gyre Gallery, Tokyo (2019) and Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (2016).